Category Archives: Grammar Punk Sentence

Make Grammar Fun with A Word With You

Emendations: to correct or alter a text in order to improve it; correct mistakes in writing before printing. To correct mistakes in something, especially a piece of writing before it is printed

Not to be confused with the word amend—though they are similar in sound and very similar in definition. Amend: to make changes to something, especially a piece of text, in order to improve or correct it.

Emend is a transitive verb where amend is merely a verb. A transitive verb requires one or more objects in a sentence. Amend also has other meanings. All in all, this is one of those words that don’t see a lot of use but it’s still a good one to have on hand. Especially if you want to vex someone in your next Scrabble match.

Grammar Punk Sentence: N E 5 emend

Against her vehement objections, Clementine’s text was emended in the second draft.

Give it a try. Write a Grammar Punk sentence that includes at least 5 words that contain the letters N and E and the word emend.

Make Grammar Fun with A Word With You

Elide:

  • to suppress or alter (as a vowel or syllable) by elision
  • to strike out (as a written word)
  • to leave out of consideration

I like this word. It of course calls to mind its near look-alike, elude, to evade or escape. I’ll admit to having never used it myself, I just ran across it while reading an article. It’s a good word to add to your vernaculars. It says what it means and it will make you look smart using it.

Grammar Punk Sentence: R E 5 elide

With a ruthless stroke of her red pen, Mrs. Calcutta elided every last trace of imagination and whimsy from her students’ essays.

Write a Grammar Punk sentence that includes at least 5 words with the letters R and E and the word elide.

Go to www.grammarpunk.com for more ideas to make teaching grammar fun.

Create Grammar Fun with A Word With You

Quondam: former or sometime

I really hate to admit but I’d never heard of this one. Which is a shame because it is a handy little word. It comes from 16th century
Latin. Quondum which means at one time or formerly.

Teachers of English, I strongly urge you to fit this handy and little used word as well as many others I’ve illuminated in his blog
into yours—and your students lexicons—lest they disappear forever which would truly be a shame. Make a fun grammar lesson out of it by challenging them to use the word in several sentences.

Grammar Punk Sentence: G I 3 quondam

Hoping to regain his quondam days of glory, Jenkins refused to give up bowling.

Write a Grammar Punk sentence that contains at least three words with the letters G and I and the word quondam.

Teaching Grammar with A Word With You

Asperity | as·per·i·ty | əˈsperitē

 1.    harshness of tone or manner

  1. 2.    something that is hard to bear because of its harshness or severity
  2. 3.    a rough edge on a surface
  3. 4.    physics a region of contact between two load-bearing flat surfaces

This is another word that is not used as much as it should be. I like to think it’s also one of those words that sounds like its definition. Just say the word aloud and your mouth curves into a kind of sneer that would fit using the word in irritation.

Teachers, check yourself next time you’re using your tone of asperity to catch the attention of a rowdy class. Then give them something to write about.

Grammar Punk Sentence: W E 2

As her patience began to ebb, Constance allowed more than a trace of asperity to color her tone, there were limits, after all.

Give it a try. Write a Grammar Punk sentence with at least 2 words that contain the letters W and E and the word asperity.

 

Get Into Grammar with Grammar Punk

ef·fron·ter·y

iˈfrəntərē

 Effrontery: behavior or an attitude that is so bold or arrogant as to be insulting

 Late 17th cent.: from French effronterie, based on late Latin effrons, effront- ‘shameless, barefaced,’ from ex- ‘out’ + frons ‘forehead

This is one of those words that is just not used enough. Which is a shame since it’s been around so long. And it has forehead in it! The idea of effrontery is certainly with us, just read the tabloids in the supermarket line sometime.

Teachers, this is a great word to explore with your students. Challenge them to think of examples of effrontery. It shouldn’t be hard. Then get them writing about it.

Grammar Punk Sentence: D E 3 effrontery

Appalled at the sheer effrontery of the number of zombies, Jessica vowed to never attend another costume party in this lifetime.

Give it a try. Write a Grammar Punk sentence using at least 3 words with the letters D and E and the word effrontery.

Make Grammar Fun with A Word With You

Agreeable: pleasing to the senses or to somebody’s taste

pleasant, friendly, and ready to please others

willing to consent to or consider something

good enough or suitable for somebody

I’ve been killing my long commute every morning with books on tape—or to be precise, audio books on my iPod.  This week’s offering happens to be Pride and Prejudice. It’s a lovely book, and a long-winded one positively stuffed to the gills with twenty dollar words and phrses and colloquialisms that are sadly long gone. Agreeable being an-oft used one and a word you almost never hear anymore. More’s the pity.

Jane liked the word agreeable and used it in each and every one of it’s definitions. Elizabeth’s sister Jane was agreeable, Mr. Bingley was decidely agreeable, the English countryside was agreeable and Elizabeth’s friend Miss Lucas was most agreeable. And yes, I’m going to say that Jane did indeed rather overuse this rather bland little word—at least if feels more that way having it read aloud by a soft-spoken English accent. It’s still a good word. A very agreeable word.

Grammar Punk Sentence: L E 4 Agreeable

Though entirely and noticeably agreeable on the surface, everyone knew that beneath Stu’s clown makeup there lurked a grouch.

Teachers of English, grammar, and writing, challenge your students to see how agreeable—or disagreeable characters in their favorite books can be. Then write about it.

Create Grammar Fun with A Word With You

Eleemosynary: el·ee·mos·y·nar·y: relating to, given as, or depending on charitable gifts

 I love long words, I’m crazy about them and regularly despair the demise of their regular use…this one may be the exception to the rule. It’s a good word, a nicely pretentious word with a lovely sense of gravitas to go along with it. It’s also a fairly ridiculous sort of word even I can’t see myself slipping into casual conversation. Just pronouncing the thing is laborious.

So the next time you’re feeling charitable or want to be a receiver of charity, just use the word charity. On the other hand, if you really want to impress—and/or confuse someone—go ahead and tell them that you recently find yourself in need of a bit of eleemosynary assistance.

N A 3 eleemosynary

Always a compassionate person, Mrs. Newicki pointed out gently but firmly that the library was not to be used in an eleemosynary fashion; books would be returned on time and in acceptable condition or there would be fines to pay!

Give it a try. Write a Grammar Punk sentence that include at least 3 words that contain the letters N and A and the word eleemosynary.

Teachers, use this exercise to fashion a fun grammar game. Have some fun with the word. Ask for examples of charitable works, see how many
words can be created from the word, encourage them write a paragraph or two about other pretentious words. Above all else, have fun with grammar!

Make Grammar Fun with A Word With You

Trepidation: A feeling of fear or agitation about something that may happen.

trep·i·da·tion ˌtrepəˈdāSH(ə)n/

This one goes back to about 1600. Apparently fear and trembling has been around for a while. This is a great word, very descriptive. It’s not just about being scared or fearful it’s about being scared and fearful about something that may—or may not—happen. Now that’s fear.

Teachers of English, grammar and writing discuss this concept with your students. What causes them trepidation? Pop quizzes? Shakespeare? Algebra? Have them put it in a Grammar Punk Sentence, then write about a character who has definite trepidation about…something.

Grammar Punk Sentence: T U 2 trepidation

Though she hated to admit it, Sophie was feeling a major case of trepidation about landing the lead in the school play; why she’d auditioned for Our Town was a mystery.

Give it a try. Write a Grammar Punk Sentence that contains at least 2 words that contain the letters T and U and the word trepidation.

Go to www.grammarpunk.com to find more ways to make teaching grammar fun.

Make Grammar Fun with A Word With You

Trepidation: A feeling of fear or agitation about something that may happen.

trep·i·da·tion ˌtrepəˈdāSH(ə)n/

This one goes back to about 1600. Apparently fear and trembling has been around for a while. This is a great word, very descriptive. It’s not just about being scared or fearful it’s about being scared and fearful about something that may—or may not—happen. Now that’s fear.

Teachers of English, grammar and writing discuss this concept with your students. What causes them trepidation? Pop quizzes? Shakespeare? Algebra? Have them put it in a Grammar Punk Sentence, then write about a character who has definite trepidation about…something.

Grammar Punk Sentence: T U 2 trepidation

Though she hated to admit it, Sophie was feeling a major case of trepidation about landing the lead in the school play; why she’d auditioned for Our Town was a mystery.

Give it a try. Write a Grammar Punk Sentence that contains at least 2 words that contain the letters T and U and the word trepidation.

Go to www.grammarpunk.com to find more ways to make teaching grammar fun.

Make Grammar Fun with a Word With You

Quondam: former or sometime

I really hate to admit but I’d never heard of this one. Which is a shame because it is a handy little word. It comes from 16th century
Latin. Quondum which means at one time or formerly.

Teachers of English, I strongly urge you to fit this handy and little used word as well as many others I’ve illuminated in his blog
into yours—and your students lexicons—lest they disappear forever which would truly be a shame. Make a fun grammar lesson out of it by challenging them to use the word in several sentences.

Grammar Punk Sentence: G I 3 quondam

Hoping to regain his quondam days of glory, Jenkins refused to give up bowling.

Write a Grammar Punk sentence that contains at least three words with the letters G and I and the word quondam.